The chicken fence potato tower is a easy and productive means of growing potatoes, especially when using straw. Regular watering is essential for growing potatoes indoors, as they cannot resist droughts and infrequent watering. Alternatively, buy potatoes and leave them near a window for a few days until they start sprouting eyes. Thank you! Set the potato in the glass so the toothpicks support it on the rim and the bottom one-third of the potato is in the water. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. Change the water in the jar if it gets cloudy. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Change the water if it becomes brown or cloudy. Keep the soil moist but do not give more water make it like mud. Leave the potato in the sun until it begins to sprout roots, and then plant the sprouted potatoes root-side down in a container of loamy soil. Wish me luck. Placing small stones or pebbles in the bottom of the pot will ensure that water can get out of the soil and not cause mildew or rot. potato. Video of the Day. So what's next? When to Plant Potatoes. Just wrap the potato in some newspaper and put it in your closet. Yes. The design can be as simple as driving four snow-fence posts at corners in a square, then tightly binding the fencing around the poles. Select a potato that has visible sprouts but is small enough in diameter to fit inside the glass. To “hill” your potatoes, pile soil up around the stems to create a 1 … This will also remove pesticide residue and growth retardant if you aren't using organic potatoes. Grocery store potatoes usually sprout and grow well for growing potatoes for a houseplant, but don't plant them out in the vegetable garden because they can spread disease. Potatoes should be ready for harvesting in 10-12 weeks, or when the foliage begins to die. Maintain even moisture throughout the growing process—1-2 inches of water per week is ideal. Potato plants should be watered deeply, especially if it gets very hot and dry. ", "This helped my kids learn easier in the class room. For more mature and larger potatoes, wait 1-2 weeks before harvesting. Leave your seed potatoes by a window until they grow sprouts. Chit your potatoes by leaving them in natural light to sprout. You see, it is not rocket science, and the technique is very simple as well. Also, knowing that seeing these above root, "The article inspired me to try my hand at planting potatoes! No root cellar? Potatoes can be grown from true potato seeds (TPS) which are collected from the berries of the potato plant. in Resourceful backyard gardeners fashion potato towers from chicken fence or other wire fencing. How to Grow a Yukon Gold Potato Vine Indoors, Children's Directions for Growing a Sweet Potato Vine. Potatoes shipped to stores have growth retardant on them; if you don’t wash all of the retardant off, your potato will not sprout. Feeling lonely and sad? The potato is the nutrient pack for the sprout. A plant doesn't like wet feet. An expert weighs in on how to feel better. Make sure not to overwater the potatoes for 2 … Remember that one of the keys to growing potatoes is keeping your soil moist, not wet. I also liked the pictures that accompanied the steps, it helped me understand which way to place the potato when sprouting and planting. The hardest part of growing potatoes is dealing with the numerous pests that attack the plants. Add water if necessary to keep the potato submerged. They are my all-time favorite vegetable, and now I, "I appreciated the simple, step-by-step instructions with simple pictures. If you don’t have a root cellar, you can store them in the vegetable bin of your refrigerator. The general rule is to provide it 1 to 2 inches of water per week, including rain fall. The plants are started indoors and then transplanted to their permanent growing location. By signing up you are agreeing to receive emails according to our privacy policy. Insert about four toothpicks approximately 2/3 of the way up the potato; closest to the end that has … Growing potatoes from true potato seeds is fun and you can discover some very good new varieties, but it is not as reliable as growing potatoes from tubers. Potatoes grown in water or small pots usually won't produce large enough tubers for eating, but the vines are attractive and feature star-shaped purple flowers. Support wikiHow by This cannot be stressed enough. For tips from our Horticulturist reviewer on storing your newly harvested potatoes, read on! Therefore, you must be wondering if there’s any way to grow sweet potatoes in a pot, indoors. Potatoes grow long vines filled with dark green leaves. This article has been viewed 349,847 times. ", think that there's a chance for me to harvest some potatoes. You can just use everyday items! Can I use one of my harvested potatoes for my next crop? If you plant a potato you have purchased from a grocery store, you must be sure to wash it thoroughly before planting. This article has been viewed 349,847 times. Herbs. A clear cup helps you to see when the water is dirty and needs to be changed, but the color of the cup itself does not matter. Well, thanks to your article now I, "It was very helpful to know about the toxicity of the above root tubers. Set the glass in an area that receives about six hours of direct sunlight. It feeds the growing sprout while it's trying to establish roots. ", "My lizards love to play in my new potato plant!". Growing potatoes from TPS is much like growing tomatoes from seed. Maggie Moran is a Professional Gardener in Pennsylvania. For tips from our Horticulturist reviewer on storing your newly harvested potatoes, read on! Potatoes will last about 5 months in a dark, cool place. It’s best to space them evenly around the potato. Increase that number by one for every additional four square inches (so, four seed potatoes for a 16-inch by 16-inch space). Your indoor potato plant might get aphids, but you can eliminate them by spraying the potato leaves with a mixture of mild dish detergent and water. Small white rootlets should grow into the water within one to two weeks, and stems should follow soon after. In a foot-square container, plant three seed potatoes with the sprouts facing up. ", "As I am planning to use a grocery store potato, it was very good to know that I needed to thoroughly wash the, "I honestly thought that if a planted a potato, it would grow, no matter what. You have a jar, a bit of water, and a sprouting spud, with little white and green sprouts poking from every healthy eye.. Much to your surprise, these little guys seem to keep growing, regardless of the neglect they received; especially if they were in your pantry for months. Don’t plant the potatoes too close to the sides of the container as this will limit the tubers from growing. ", will have organic potatoes right at my doorstep! ", "The part with the toothpick was the best, very simple to understand. Last Updated: February 23, 2020 Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Alternatively, use a pot with drainage holes in the bottom. The eyes of potatoes are small spots on the skin; this is the part that germinates. Did you know you can read expert answers for this article? ", "My potatoes already have sprouts and I want to grow the plants to make more. I'm confused! Insert at least four toothpicks about ¼ inch into the potato so the ends balance on top of the container rim. Enrich your potting soil with organic compost before you plant. Fill a pot with commercial potting mix, then water until the soil is moist but not dripping wet. A 6-inch (15 cm.) Does it have to be a small see-through cup or can it be a small white cup? Hill the potatoes every 1-2 weeks. Potatoes are a wonderful source of nutrients and can be stored for long periods of time after harvesting. How to Propagate the Plectranthus "Mona Lavender", University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension: Houseplants From the Kitchen, Iowa State University, Idaho Museum of Natural History: Potato Projects. By using our site, you agree to our. ", tubers indicates harvesting time was useful! To grow potatoes indoors, purchase seed potatoes, and cut each cleaned potato in half widthwise. % of people told us that this article helped them. All you need to do is have a little patience and take proper care of the potato seeds. Replenish the water in the glass, as needed, to maintain its depth. Otherwise, the potato pieces are more likely to rot before they grow into potato plant houseplants. Growing potatoes in bags and tires are just two of them. If you have a bucket, a glass of water, some toothpicks, and soil, you've got everything you need to grow potatoes indoors. [1] X Research source Alternatively, buy potatoes and leave them near a window for a few days until they start sprouting eyes. You will want to leave at least a walnut sized piece of potato with each sprout. They are a fun and easy home science project for children. Those above ground tubers serve as a visible indicator for the ripe potatoes underground. ", "It was amazing. Approved. With the cut portion of the potato resting in water and the upper half exposed to the air in a sunny window, supposedly roots will begin to grow from the bottom and stems from the top. Follow these steps to planting and growing your own sweet potato vine indoors . A consistent water schedule of once every four to five days is ideal for a young plant. Transplant the potato to an 8-inch pot filled with a moist potting soil if you want to continue growing the plant. Answered all my concerns by the detailed. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. Place the potato in the water so the end with the most eyes is submerged at least two inches below the water level. Cover the sprouts with soil. Even better, the leaves are edible and tasty. Keeps your potato harvest going by planting successive indoor pots of seed potatoes every 3 to 4 weeks. unlocking this expert answer. Add some more soil and slightly water. I just love your site, the pictures are so helpful. Can You Plant Small Red Potatoes Like You Would Sweet Potatoes and Get a Vine? The trick is to water the pot until it seeps out of the bottom holes. Add 6 inches of potting mix to your container, place the potatoes on top, and cover them with another 6 inches of potting mix. So, you want to grow your very own, delicious, nutritious potato…. One potato with 6 or 7 eyes can yield up to 2 lb (910 g) of potatoes. Your soil should be as wet as a wrung-out sponge. Take care not to break the roots or stems when transplanting. In Northern regions, some gardeners will plant the first crop of early-maturing potatoes in early to mid-April, 6 to 8 weeks before the average last frost date or as soon as the soil can be worked; they can survive some cool weather but the threat of frost is a gamble. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. Potatoes grown in a water glass provide indoor greenery, while also allowing you to easily view root and stem formation for a plant. To grow potatoes indoors, find a container with a capacity of at least 2.5 gallons. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. Take your potato chunks and place them on the dirt, cut side down. Potatoes prefer cool weather. I have a potato that has six sprouts. Potato requires a good amount of water and moisture which may not be available indoors. If your celery has a little bit of root at the bottom, you can sprout the leftover … wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. ", "I wanted to plant things and this was amazing! Simply put, to grow potatoes indoors, find a container that’s 16 inches wide and tall. Fill the jar about two-thirds full with water, deep enough to cover half of the potato. Buy seed potatoes that have a lot of eyes. Potatoes grown in a water glass provide indoor greenery, while also allowing you to easily view root and stem formation for a plant. This article was co-authored by Maggie Moran. © Copyright 2020 Hearst Communications, Inc. "I wanted to know how to grow a potato plant and therefore the instructions are clear to understand. Growing a potato in water for a science project will allow students to see the growth of a root system and experiment with how different nutrients affect the growth of the potato. Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Water well and place in a sunny spot. Common Issues And Solutions to Growing Potatoes. It is the above ground tubers on the vines that are not edible (they are actually poisonous!). You'll have to store the potatoes in a cool, dry place, preferably with layers of dry material such as clean paper shreds or dry straw around them. 4. Keep the soil moist and leave the container in the sun. Tend the Growing Potatoes . It strikes when your potatoes were planted during an unusually wet period and when the temperatures are still cold. ", "What stood out to me was the yield of potatoes grown from a pot, 7. Herbs (a subset of vegetables) love the sunshine, so you're going to have to … Insert four toothpicks into the potato, spacing them around the middle of the potato about two-thirds up from the end with the densest sprouts. When the leaves begin to turn yellow, harvest the potatoes! Watching potato plants grow will help to teach preschool children about the parts of a growing plant. 3. Water your newly planted potatoes well. 2. There are many ways of growing potatoes indoors. This is called “hilling” and it protects the potatoes from the sun, as well as supports the plant. 1. One of the easiest plants to grow indoors is the potato. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening. You must water your potato plants regularly; keep the soil moist, but not soggy. ", Unlock expert answers by supporting wikiHow, https://www.growveg.com/guides/a-simple-way-to-get-high-yields-of-potatoes/, https://www.gardenguides.com/94261-grow-potato-plant-inside.html, https://www.growveg.com/guides/how-to-successfully-grow-potatoes-in-containers/, https://saramoulton.com/2012/08/potatoes-what-is-the-best-way-to-store-potatoes/, https://www.doesitgobad.com/do-potatoes-go-bad/, cultiver des pommes de terre en intérieur, consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. ", "It was very informative and explained concisely what needs to be done for a fruitful harvest. The cold temperature of the fridge will convert the starch in potatoes to sugar, so be sure to use them within 1 week. "Yes, it helped, and quickly without having to look through numerous pages to get to the point of what I researched. ", "My 4 year old granddaughter was able to follow the steps via the pictures as I read the directions-thank you! Be sure the pot has a drainage hole in the bottom. Potatoes grow best when they have a steady supply of 2-3 inches of water per week without fully drying out. If that’s the case and if you have always wanted to grow sweet potatoes in a pot, either because you do not have a huge garden or you simply want to try something new, then stick with me and I will teach you how to do that. Just about any kind of dirt will do, provided it contains some compost or manure. As the plant grows you need to give it more water. Try to maintain the moisture of soil while avoiding overwatering. ", "Simple, to the point, and all you need to know to get started! How do you get edible potatoes? This article was co-authored by Maggie Moran. Growing in Water Growing potatoes in water requires you to suspend the potato cutting or seed in a container of water with at least one sprouting eye facing up. Potato bugs are only a pest problem for potatoes grown outdoors. This article received 27 testimonials and 89% of readers who voted found it helpful, earning it our reader-approved status. Provide enough water to a potato plant so that its soil is moist, but not saturated. Step 8 says to dig up the potatoes but they aren't edible. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/b6\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-01.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-01.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/b6\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-01.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-01.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/78\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-02.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-02.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/78\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-02.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-02.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/8a\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-03.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-03.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/8a\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-03.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-03.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/61\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-04.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-04.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/61\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-04.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-04.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/7b\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-05.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-05.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/7b\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-05.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-05.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/62\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-06.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-06.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/62\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-06.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-06.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/d\/d5\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-07.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-07.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/d\/d5\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-07.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-07.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/a\/a4\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-08.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-08.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/a\/a4\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-08.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-08.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/84\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-09.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-09.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/84\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-09.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-09.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/33\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-10-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-10-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/33\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-10-Version-3.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-10-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/3c\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-11-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-11-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/3c\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-11-Version-3.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-11-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/7a\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-12-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-12-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/7a\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-12-Version-3.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-12-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/1a\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-13-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-13-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/1a\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-13-Version-3.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-13-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/0\/0b\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-14-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-14-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/0\/0b\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-14-Version-3.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-14-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/25\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-15-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-15-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/2\/25\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-15-Version-3.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-15-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/33\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-16-Version-3.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-16-Version-3.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/33\/Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-16-Version-3.jpg\/aid2212158-v4-728px-Grow-Potatoes-Indoors-Step-16-Version-3.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"